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PHOTOS: 6 powerful ‘March on Washington’ images

PHOTOS: 6 powerful ‘March on Washington’ images

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledges the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for his "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington, D.C. in this Aug. 28, 1963 file photo. Photo: Associated Press

We’ve come a long way in 50 years. Today, the nation celebrates the Civil Right Movement by remembering the anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

This aerial view shows crowds at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington during Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech on Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo)
This aerial view shows crowds at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington during Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech on Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo)
People carry civil rights signs as they gather in Washington, D.C. before Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech on Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo)
People carry civil rights signs as they gather in Washington, D.C. before Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech on Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo)
 FILE - The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, speaks to thousands during his "I Have a Dream" speech. (AP Photo)

FILE – The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, speaks to thousands during his “I Have a Dream” speech. (AP Photo)
Thousands gather at the Washington Monument grounds on Aug. 28, 1963 before marching to the Lincoln Memorial. (AP Photo)
Thousands gather at the Washington Monument grounds on Aug. 28, 1963 before marching to the Lincoln Memorial. (AP Photo)
FILE - The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. waves to the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. waves to the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial on Aug. 28, 1963. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - President John F. Kennedy stands with a group of leaders of the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 2013 at the White House. From left are Whitney Young, National Urban League; Martin Luther King Jr., Southern Christian Leadership Conference; John Lewis, Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee; Rabbi Joachim Prinz, American Jewish Congress; Dr. Eugene P. Donnaly, National Council of Churches; A. Philip Randolph, AFL-CIO vice president; Kennedy; Walter Reuther, United Auto Workers; Vice-President Johnson, rear, and Roy Wilkins, NAACP. (AP Photo/File)
FILE – President John F. Kennedy stands with a group of leaders of the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 2013 at the White House. From left are Whitney Young, National Urban League; Martin Luther King Jr., Southern Christian Leadership Conference; John Lewis, Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee; Rabbi Joachim Prinz, American Jewish Congress; Dr. Eugene P. Donnaly, National Council of Churches; A. Philip Randolph, AFL-CIO vice president; Kennedy; Walter Reuther, United Auto Workers; Vice-President Johnson, rear, and Roy Wilkins, NAACP. (AP Photo/File)

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